What are the latest online family history records?

By Rosemary Collins, 6 December 2018 - 9:41am

We take a look at this month's online family history records. This month, The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh releases its archives online and more

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh archives
This 1802 manuscript notebook by an Edinburgh University student appears in the RCSEd Digital Collections project (Credit: RSCEd)

Tracing your family history has become easier than ever as more and more records are being released online. We've put together a handy guide to help you discover the newest datasets for researching your ancestors.

In December, we take a look at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh online collections, a new collection of historic marriage licences on Findmypast and more

 

Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

What's been added?

The collections of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) are now available online for the first time. Launched on World Digital Preservation Day on 29 November, the website includes a database of society members and digitised manuscripts and photographs.

What can they tell you?

The database lists 20,227 men and women who were elected RCSEd fellows or members. It dates from 1505, when the College was founded, to 1918. It includes their names and the year they were elected. In the case of well-known individuals it has further information and links to related items in the RCSEd archives.

In addition, the College has digitised 3000 items from its collections and is being continuously updated. These include the memoirs of Thomas Hume, an Edinburgh surgeon who witnessed the execution and dissection of the serial killer William Burke in 1829. Burke, along with his partner William Hare, killed 16 people and sold the bodies to the surgeon Robert Knox for his anatomy lectures.

The website also contains a series of photographs of the Scottish Women's Hospitals. They were set up by pioneering doctor and suffragist Elsie Inglis to treat injured soldiers in the First World War.

Where do the records come from?

The records are taken from RCSEd Library and Archive and were digitised in partnership with UK Archiving and TownsWeb Archiving.

 

Findmypast

What's been added?

Findmypast has indexed and digitised a collection of more than 536,000 marriage licences dating from 1115 to 1906. It has also added new collections of Royal Air Force Lists from 1919-1922 and 1938-1945 and the Highland Free Church Birth and Baptism Index.

What can they tell you?

Marriage licences were obtained from the Church of England for a fee and with a sworn declaration that there were no legal impediments to the marriage. The licence waived the banns period necessary for a marriage to take place. The Findmypast marriage licences cover Bedfordshire, Devon, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Kent, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, London, Middlesex, Nottinghamshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Surrey, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire. They list the couples' names, residences, fathers' names, marital status and intended place of marriage.

The Birth and Baptism Index contains over 30,000 records, including the child's date and place of birth and baptism, their parents' names and residence and their father's occupation.

The Royal Air Force Lists contain the records of over 62,000 men and women, including their names, ranks and details of any honours they received.

Where do the records come from?

The marriage licence volumes are compiled from volumes provided by the College of Arms, Anguline Research Archives, and Gould Genealogy. The Birth and Baptism Index was created by the Highland Family History Society. The RAF Lists are digitised from documents kept in the National Library of Scotland.

 

Other records

Reclaim the Records has obtained the New York State Marriage Index 1881-1965 and is in the process of publishing the scanned images via the Internet Archive.

TheGenealogist has added over 1.5 million baptism, marriage and burial records to its Warwickshire Parish Record Collection.

The Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) has published lists of absent voters from the 1918 election in Counties Armagh and Londonderry/ Derry. The lists contain 8000 names of individuals who were on military service at the time.

The Railway, Work, Life and Death Project has published a spreadsheet of 641 Great Eastern Railway staff compensation records, dating from 1913 to 1923. They show workers who were injured on the job and applied to the company for financial assistance.

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (IGRS) has created a database from the Balteagh Regium Donum Petition of 1828. It lists approximately 200 Presbyterian families living near the town of Limavady in County Londonderry / Derry. Name searches are free, while the full database is only accessible to members.

The University of Cambridge Violence Research Centre has launched the London Medieval Murder Map, which allows researchers to explore the locations of 142 murders in late medieval London.

 

 

 

 

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