June family history records roundup: Over 2.8 million 1940 Scottish records go online

By Rosemary Collins, 29 May 2019 - 2:35pm

This month, we’ve got new Second World War valuation rolls on ScotlandsPeople, Welsh wills on Ancestry and more

ScotlandsPeople 1940 valuation roll
A valuation roll for the town of Wick in Caithness

Tracing your family history has become easier than ever as more and more records are being released online. 

From big commercial websites to smaller projects, we've put together a handy guide to help you discover the latest datasets for researching your family tree.

This month, we explain how new records collections can help you locate Scottish ancestors during the Second World War, find Welsh wills and more.

 

ScotlandsPeople

What's been added?

ScotlandsPeople, the National Records of Scotland’s official website, has added over 2.8 million 1940 valuation roll records, accompanied by over 60,000 images.

You can search transcriptions of the records for free and purchase credits to view the originals.

What can the records tell you?

The valuation rolls list the names and addresses of owners, tenants and occupiers in properties in Scotland.

They are particularly useful for finding ancestors after the last publicly available census in 1911.

Where do they come from?

Valuation rolls were created to help the government collect taxes.

 

Ancestry

What's been added?

Ancestry has a new collection of nearly 100,000 Welsh wills and probate records, dating from 1513 to 1838.

What can the records tell you?

Searching for your ancestor’s name and date of death could reveal the full copy of their will – potentially helping you identify other members of their family and even locate new relatives.

Where do they come from?

Until 1858, wills were proved in ecclesiastical courts. These records include the courts of the six historic dioceses in Wales – Bangor, Brecon, St David’s, Llandaff, St Asaph’s and the Peculiar of Hawarden – as well as the Diocese of Chester, which covers four parishes in Flintshire and Holt in Denbighshire. The exact dates for which wills are available vary by diocese.

If you’re not an Ancestry subscriber, the wills are also available for free on the National Library of Wales website. However, the Ancestry collection is easier to search, and allows you to download the will without paying an additional fee.

 

Other records

Findmypast has added over 114 million birth, baptism, marriage, banns, death and burial records from 20 European countries, sourced from the International Genealogical Index. It has also digitised pages from the Calendar of the Royal College of Surgeons, listing over 31,000 physicians and surgeons who practiced in England between 1830 and 1923.

FamilySearch has added 309,802 records to its collection of Great British War Office Registers (1772-1935). The records include regimental descriptions, commissions, casualties and pensions. The website also added 1,882,916 Canadian headstone records.

The Arolsen Archives (formerly known as the International Tracing Service) has published over 13 million records of victims of Nazi persecution online.

The British Film Institute has released a new collection of over 500 Victorian films on the BFI Player.

TheGenealogist has added an index of Merchant Navy apprentices from 1824-1910, including over 300,000 records of masters and apprentices.

RootsIreland has added over 9,000 Church of Ireland confirmation records from County Armagh, and 3346 Catholic baptism and marriage records from Adamstown Parish in County Wexford.

 

 

 

 

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