Genealogy news round-up: UK's first Huguenot museum to receive royal visit

By Guest, 9 July 2015 - 10:29am

Huguenot Museum

Spread across two floors, the Huguenot Museum features an array of exhibits about religion, crafts and culture (Credit: Huguenot Museum)

HRH Princess Alexandra is to visit Kent to celebrate the opening of the UK’s first dedicated Huguenot museum on Monday (13 July). Situated on Rochester High Street, the Huguenot Museum tells the story of one of Britain’s largest immigrant groups – the Huguenots – who fled religious persecution in France during the 17th and 18th centuries, mainly settling in the south-east of England. First unveiled in May, the £1.5 million museum features exhibits on notable Huguenot crafts, including silk weaving, plus research facilities for people hoping to trace their ancestors. To find out more, click here.
 

Irish parish registers online for the first time

More than a century of Irish Catholic parish registers have been uploaded to the web for the first time. Previously only available to view at the National Library of Ireland in Dublin, the record release covers more than 1,000 Catholic parishes, revealing details of baptisms and marriages across the country between the 1740s and 1880s. Read our full story here.
 

SoG to host military family history course

The Society of Genealogists has organised a half-day course on Saturday 18 July to help people trace military ancestors on the web. The workshop, led by Simon Fowler, will focus on material available via Findmypast, The National Archives and Ancestry, and will cover military history from the 1800s to the 1960s. Attendees are advised to bring details of servicemen and women they are researching to the course, which takes place between 2pm and 5pm. Tickets can be purchased here.
 

Trinity College Dublin puts WW1 exhibition on web

Trinity College Dublin has made its recent Great War Revisited exhibition available to explore online. Showcasing rare and unpublished material, items include letters and diaries from soldiers who served in France and Palestine, political pamphlets and Irish First World War recruitment posters. The content, digitised through a partnership with the Google Cultural Institute, can be accessed via mobile, tablet or desktop computer here.
 

Londoners see relatives on "one-in-four" bus journeys

A new study by AncestryDNA has suggested that London commuters will run into distant relatives on an average of one-in-four bus journeys. The likelihood of being on the same London Underground train as a cousin is even greater, it claims. The computer modelling, which takes into account changing birth rates and family sizes over the last 200 years, classes everyone from first cousins to sixth cousins as relatives. Find out more here.
 

BFI releases oldest ever home movies

An array of early ‘home movies’ are among thousands of historic films available to watch through a new British Film Institute service. Launched earlier this month, Britain on Film provides access to a vast archive of films dating back 120 years, giving a vivid insight into family life at the time. Users can search the archive via a map of the British Isles, enabling them to zoom in and find videos relating to the places their ancestors came from. Highlights include the Passmore Family Collection, which includes footage of children playing on a beach in Bognor Regis in 1903 – thought to be the earliest surviving home movie in existence.

Words: Zaki Dogliani

Irish parish registers online for the first time
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Rochester's new Huguenot Museum receives royal approval
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Irish parish registers online for the first time
previous news Article
Rochester's new Huguenot Museum receives royal approval
next news Article
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